Northampton Borough Council
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Published Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Historic England will contribute towards urgent conservation work on Northampton’s Eleanor Cross.

The cross will be added to its Heritage at Risk Register with the expectation that it can be removed again.

Historic England will contribute towards urgent conservation work on Northampton’s Eleanor Cross which will be added to its Heritage at Risk Register with the expectation that it can be removed again as soon as repairs are complete.

Northampton Borough Council has been collaborating with Historic England for some months to ensure any work carried out is in line with best practice.

As part of this, an application has been made by the council for grant funding which will enable the Grade I listed building – also a Scheduled Monument – to be preserved.

Cllr Tim Hadland, Borough Council Cabinet member for regeneration, economic development and planning, said: “This is excellent news.

“Our aspiration is to get this work under way as soon as feasibly possible and we have taken guidance from Historic England throughout the process.

“Whatever we do has to be appropriate for the monument in the long term. I can sympathize with those who feel we are not moving quickly enough on this, all I can do is reassure them that we know how critical it is that we get this right.”

The Borough Council will continue to work closely with Historic England to appoint a historic buildings specialist to act as ‘lead professional’ for the project.

Ben Robinson, Heritage at Risk Principal for Historic England in the East Midlands said: “Being included on our Heritage at Risk Register is a recognition that an important part of our heritage is at risk and needs urgent help and expert advice to conserve it.

“We are pleased to provide half of the costs to help repair Eleanor Cross so it can be enjoyed by future generations.”

The Cross, situated at the southern end of London Road close to Delapré Wood, was commissioned by Edward I between 1291 and 1294. Only three of 12 original monuments remain.

Each marks one of the nightly resting places of the King’s wife, Queen Eleanor of Castile’s, funeral procession between Harby, near Lincoln, to London.

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